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Key Steps

Key Steps

The quest is on to develop Canada’s digital infrastructure, and the federal, provincial, and territorial governments have been working hand-in-hand with the private sector to ensure the delivery of quality services that can compete on a global level.

 

The thrust of much of these efforts is toward establishing a state-of-the-art digital infrastructure that will encourage innovation, attract investors, and set the stage for a variety of globally competitive initiatives in the fields of education, research, and health care. This in turn will help reinforce Canada’s status as a world leader in an economy heavily dependent on digital infrastructure.

 

Of course, there are many significant challenges in this monumental task, much of it involving providing widespread access to high-speed network capability. This is an especially important concern for the country’s business and industrial sectors, but also for those in the educational, medical, and public service areas. By providing access to a world-class digital infrastructure, all these areas of interest will be able to take advantage of all the benefits provided by a digital-based economy.

 

What is necessary at this point is the close coordination of everyone concerned, from the government and private sectors all the way to the end users. One of the key concerns is identifying the needs of the consumers with regard to Next generation networks, which are largely what the new model of the planned digital infrastructure will be based on.

 

There is also a need to define the country’s goals for these networks, as well as a determination of the measures that will have to be implemented in order to achieve these goals. Especially close attention should be given to the present frameworks for regulation and legislation, particularly with regard to encouraging investment and fostering healthy competition.

 

There are numerous other factors to consider in order to achieve Canada’s goal for a globally competitive digital infrastructure. With the concerted efforts of the government and the private sector, these goals may yet become a reality.